History of the World Part 2 Release Date: Why a Series Fits the Brooks Mold?

The 42-year wait for the long-awaited sequel to History Of The World Part II by Mel Brooks follows an odd pattern. Popular movie sequels can occasionally appear in the strangest and most unlikely places. It can be simple to overlook a sequel when waiting for a legendary movie to continue on the big screen because they can sneak up as overlooked computer games, novels, or even television shows.

But storytelling is a kind of expression that may take many different forms, and in a franchise, it doesn’t always start or end in a movie theatre.

Mel Brooks parodied Hollywood’s historical movie trends in History of the World Part I, which had its first premiere in 1981. A preview for History of the World Part II appeared after the original movie’s climax, teasing marvels like “Hitler on ice,” “a Viking burial,” and “Jews in space.”

Even though it was only intended to be a joke, streaming service Hulu announced in 2021 that Mel Brooks’ comedy will finally get a sequel in the shape of a television series that would continue a funny look at history.

History of the World, Part 2 is Not Mel Brooks’ First Tv Sequel That Came Out Late

History of the World, Part I wasn’t the only Mel Brooks movie to promise a sequel that never came out. What’s even stranger is that History of the World Part II isn’t the only follow-up movie by Mel Brooks that has been shown on TV.

 

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Mel Brooks’s parody of Star Wars, Spaceballs, made a joke about a sequel called Spaceballs 2: The Search for More Money. This joke became one of the most popular parts of the movie. People wondered if Spaceballs 2 would ever be made, but many of them didn’t know that Spaceballs: The Animated Series was a kind of sequel.

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Mel Brooks and G4 worked together in 2005 to make the animated TV show Spaceballs: The Animated Series. It would bring back a lot of the actors from the first movie, like Dom Deluise, Joan Rivers, and Daphne Zuniga, and continue Lone Starr’s story after rewriting what happened in the first movie.

Spaceballs: The Animated Series used Brooks as a voice actor and consultant, but not as a full-time writer. The show made fun of movies like Jurassic Park, Lord of the Rings, and the Star Wars prequels.

Spaceballs: The Animated Series only had 14 episodes and was criticized for having humor that seemed to be based on Family Guy and not having Brooks’ wit. It is now forgotten as the long-awaited sequel that didn’t quite live up to expectations.

History of the World Part 2 Can Be Mel Brooks’ Triumphant Return

History of the World Part II might be Mel Brooks’ return to form as an adult-oriented filmmaker after Paws of Fury: The Legend of Hank, a family-friendly adaptation of Blazing Saddles, failed to live up to expectations. Another Brooks masterpiece is long overdue, especially with movies like The Producers and Young Frankenstein still being hailed as masterpieces.

History of the World Part II can not only carry on the weird heritage of Spaceballs: The Animated Series but also make up for its flaws by becoming a TV sequel that was well worth the wait and already carrying years of hype and implying Mel was lovingly involved.

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It’s possible that episodes of Spaceballs: The Animated Series and History of the World Part II aren’t always what viewers expected. Sequels frequently confront high expectations and a difficult act to follow, especially when they arrive decades later, regardless of how they continue their plot.

Many could contend that History of the World Part II is too late or that the humor of the first installment cannot be recreated in this one because of how drastically circumstances have changed. However, the fact that History of the World was preserved by Hulu more than 40 years after its release demonstrates that Mel Brooks believed there was a new comedy to be told and that his work is genuinely ageless.

Why the Sequel Wasn’t Planned?

Part II of History of the World was entirely unplanned. Despite being hinted at after the first film, the teaser was just supposed to be humorous. It has fleeting glimpses of Jews in Space (a Star Wars parody) and Hitler on Ice (the tyrant skating), but it never intended to go anywhere. The notion of a sequel was ultimately abandoned before it could be explored due to the low box office results and negative reaction, in addition to other factors.

However, Brooks is highly aware of his brand. He has understood that he can use his current assets and show them in a little different manner to a new generation. This was true when he restaged The Producers (1968) and Young Frankenstein (1974) as musicals on Broadway.

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The musical The Producers was later restaged as a movie. Brooks has also frequently collaborated with longtime friend Carl Reiner to continue their 2000 Year Old Man series with recordings and a follow-up book. Mel Brooks believes that nothing compares to the invention, yet there is also success in building on a successful career.

Why a Series Fits the Brooks Mold?

All of the things that Brooks has learned over his career have culminated in this effort. Additionally, it is the initiative of a person who is old enough to be risk-free. To get his message out to the public, Brooks has chosen to revamp a fan favorite, present it in a fresh format, and enlist contemporary talent. Nick Kroll, Zazie Beetz, Taika Waititi, Ike Berenholtz, and a who’s who of contemporary comedy are expected to be in the cast.

 

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However, why stream? Why bother making a follow-up to something that was never intended to have? The solution is simple. Mel Brooks despises inertia. He detests the concept of not participating in the conversation or of being mentioned in the past tense.

He is a man who enjoys being relevant in every media. He has experience in the television industry, having created and produced the popular Get Smart series. It was never his, though. You can be sure he will give it everything he has because this could very well be his final major undertaking.

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